Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Lt. George RIVES

Changed the spelling of last name to "Reeves". Some records show name
spelled as "Reeve". George left a will in 1778 in Prince William county,
Virginia. He served 7 months as Pvt. and a Lt. in the Rev. war. Came to
upper part of South Carolina on received land grant in Abbeville Co. 21
miles (?) from city. Some records show he had 5 sons and 5 daughters.


Isaac REEVES

LAST CHILD LISTED AS B. 1779 BUT THAT WOULD MAKE JANE 49


John RIVES

Was the first in line to sometimes spell his last name "Reeves". Lived
in Northumberland County, Virginia. Wife is unknown.


William RYVES

Childs' "Reliques of the Rives" show William to be the first Rives in Virginia and the father of George, Robert, John, and Timothy. However, Childs later came to believe that William's half-brother Timothy could have been the first Rives in America and the father of these four sons. Until we have more information, we will stay with Childs' original version. According to "Our Reeves and Related Families" by Beulah McGuire Reeves and Bessie Reeves Hoke William's father died the year the English Civil War began, and at the age of 16 young William came to Virginia. He came to Virginia between 1653 and 1654 and settled in Surrey County, Virginia His father died in 1643, the year the war broke out and for a time Oxford was the storm center of the revolt. William was only 16 years old when he was imported by Littleton Scarburg into Surry County, Virginia (about 1652). By 1684 he had paid his indenture and began to appear in county records as a free man. We have found no will or estate settlement, but he seems to have had at least five sons, but there is no way of identifying possible daughters he may have had. His wife's name is not known. Greer, George Cabell. "Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666." Reprint. Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1960." Page 274 - Wm arrived in Virginia in 1652. Notes from: "The Descendants of William and Elizabeth Ryves" by Barry L. Reeves William RYVES was only about six years old in 1642 when civil war broke out in England. The RYVES family were supporters of King Charles I, and when he was removed from the throne and eventually executed, his followers were not looked upon with favor. William's father Timothy, died in 1643, leaving William without a father during a most uncertain time. Later when he was sixteen years old, William decided to come to America and start a new life. According to immigration records, William was imported as an indentured servant by Littleton Scarburg into Surry County, Virginia in 1652. It is not known the exact term of his indenture, but by 1684, he was appearing in county records as a free man. No Will or estate settlement has yet to be found, but he is believed to have had five sons. His wife's maiden name and the names of possible daughters are not known. This William Ryves is believed to be the immigrant ancestor of most if not all of the Reeves family who trace their origins back to Virginia and the Carolinas. Many of William's descendants migrated from Virginia into North and South Carolina, then on into Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Texas. More About William Ryves: Comment 1: #6 in RR (page 7) Ethnicity/Relig.: WASP Event 1: 1652, imp by Littleton Scarburg, Surrey Co, VA Event 2: 1684, appears as freeman on records. Residence: came to America at age 16 More About William Ryves and Elizabeth (Ryves): Marriage: 1659, Surry County, Virginia William was the first Reeves to come to America. Born in Woodstock, Oxford, England, he was recorded as having been buried in Surry County, Virginia. William Ryves’ father, Timothy, died in 1643 shortly after the English Civil War began, leaving William and his brothers in the storm center of the revolt, Oxford. When William was 16, he was imported by Littleton Scarburg into Surry County, Virginia, around 1652. By 1684, William had paid his indenture and became a freeman. William appears in George Cabell Greer’s “Early Virginia Immigrants, 1632-1666” on page 274. (“Wm arrived in Virginia in 1652.”) Despite not being a landowner at first, Ryves held the family tradition of perseverance proud and rejoined the ranks of the older Ryves, amassing considerable holdings in America. William and Elizabeth had a number of children, though the exact number in unsure. Only sons were recorded, and of those he had five, George, Robert, John, Timothy, and William II.
--------------
His father died in 1643, the year the war broke out and for a time Oxford
was the center of the revolt. William was only 16 years old when he was
imported by Littleton Scarburg into Surry County, Virginia (about1652).
By 1684 he had paid his indenture and began to appear in county records
as a free man. We have found no will or estate settlement, but he seems
to have had at least five sons, but there is no way of identifying possible
daughters he may have had. His wife's name is not known.

Source: Greer, George Cabell. "Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666.
William arrived in Virginia in 1652

WILLIAM RYVES

1636 - c 1695

(father of William Rives #8)
Born at Woodstock, England, died in VA
Occupation: Unknown
Spouse: Unknown

Biographical: At age 16 William was imported into Surry County, VA by Littleton Scarburg. By 1684 he had paid his indenture and became a free man. He died in VA.

His issue:

i. George Rives = Frances ------------

ii. Robert Rives = Sarah ---------

iii. John Rives = Grace ---------

iv. Timothy Rives = Judith ----------

v. William Rives = 1. -----------; 2. Margaret --------(see #8)


Timothy RIVES

The fact that his death and burial are mentioned in Wood's SURVEY OF
THE ANTIQUITIES OF OXFORD indicates that he was a man of prominence.
It is interesting to note that the name Timothy occurs nowhere else in
other branches of the family, but does appear repeatedly among the
descendents of Richard. Timothy is mentioned by Hutchins as a
gentleman of the parish of ST. Mary Magdalene in Oxford City, and as
Steward of the University of Oxford. It seems likely that the young
Timothy may have owed his preferment at Oxford to two of his uncles,
Dr. George Ryves and Sir William Ryves. Dr George was chancellor at law
in 1615; J.P. in 1618 of the parish of St Mary Magdalene. From the
scarcity of records it is supposed that Timothy was orphaned at an early
age and that he, as only son and heir, was taken under the care of his
kinsmen. It is a fact that Timothy named two of his sons for these two
uncles who were in a position to befriend a needy relative.. The parish
register shows two marriages and two sons by each wife.

Notes for Timothy Rives: [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #2780, Date of Import: Dec 31, 1998] Listed as one of the privileged persons residing at Oxford in 1624. It is conjectured that he was left a orphan by the possible early death of his father, Richard Ryves, and that he was taken under the protection of his kinsmen, Dr. Geroge Ryves and Sir William Ryves, at Oxford. He was twice married. By his first wife, Mary, there were two sons, Richard and Timothy, and his second wife, Elizabeth, bore him George and William. [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4414, Date of Import: Dec 30, 1998] The fact that his death and burial are mentioned in Wood's SURVEY OF THE ANTIQUITIES OF OXFORD indicates that he was a man of prominence. It is interesting to note that the name, Timothy occurs nowhere else in other branches of the family, but does appear repeatedly among the descendents of Richard. Timothy is mentioned by Hutchins as a gentleman of the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in Oxford City, and as Steward of the University of Oxford. It seems likely that the young Timothy may have owed his preferment at Oxford to two of his uncles, Dr. George Ryves and Sir William Ryves. Dr. George was chancellor of Oxford in 1601, was warden of New College in 1599. Sir William was Chancellor at law in 1615; J.P. in 1618 of the parish of St. Mary Magdalene. From the scarcity of records it is supposed that Timothy was orphaned at an early age and that he, as only son and heir, was taken under the care of his kinsmen. It is a fact that Timothy named two of his sons for these two uncles who were in a position to befriend a needy relative. The parish register shows two marriages and two sons by each wife. NOTE: May have been born at Woodstock, England More About Timothy Rives: Burial: September 1643, England Burial Location: 1643, Parish Of St, mary Magdalen Comment 1: Uncle Dr Geo Ryves, Chancellor of Oxford Comment 2: in 1601 & Warden of New College in 1599. Comment 3: d & bur. in Wood's SURVEY OF THE ANTIQUITI Comment 4: ES OF OXFORD. Probably orphaned early. Ethnicity/Relig.: Gent, Parish of St Mary Magdelene, Oxford Residence: Oxford More About Timothy Rives and Elizabeth (Rives): Marriage: 1630, Dorsetshire, England Continuing the Reeves tradition of prominence at Oxford was Timothy Ryves, born in Dorset and buried there on 30 Sep 1643. His status was such that he earned mention in Wood’s “Survey of the Antiquities of Oxford.” Timothy is the only son to bear his first name in all of the branches of the Reeves family, and his children would be the only ones to name children Timothy in the future. Timothy was admitted to the University of Oxford to learn the art of brewing on 11 March 1611. Hutchins identifies Timothy as a parishioner of St. Mary Magdalene in Oxford City, and as Steward of the University of Oxford. He was listed in the Oxford records as a “privileged person.” Most likely Timothy earned preferment at Oxford through his uncles, Dr. George Ryves (warden of New College in 1599, chancellor of Oxford in 1601) and Sir William Ryves (chancellor-at-law in 1615, and J.P. of the Parish of St. Mary Madgalene in 1618.). He was orphaned at a very young age, and was probably taken in by George and Sir William. It is known that he named two of his children after them. In 1646, Oxford, the city in which Charles I sought refuge from the Civil War, surrendered to Parliament. A close relative of Timothy’s, Dr. Brune Ryves, Chaplain to Charles I, was in Oxford at the time of the surrender. He was given, under the articles of surrender, “…full liberty at any time within six months to doe to any convenient Port and Transport himselfe with his servents, Goods, and Necessaries beyond the Seas.” Although Dr. Ryves did not, it is assumed that Timothy and his sons were granted the same right. Many Rives were involved in overseas trade in the early 17th century. Timothy married Mary [?-8 Nov 1629] sometime before 1623. Mary passed away in 1629, and was buried in Dorset. Timothy and Mary had two children, Richard [ca. 1623] (another student at Oxford) and Timothy II [9 Aug 1625-p. 1643]. Both sons were born in Oxford. After Mary’s death in 1629, he married Elizabeth [ca.1600-16 Aug 1643] sometime before 1632. They had two children, George and William, named for Timothy’s uncles. Alt Name: Timothy Ryves. The fact that his death and burial are mentioned in Wood's SURVEY OF THE ANTIQUITIES OF OXFORD indicates that he was a man of prominence. It is interesting to note that the name, Timothy, occurs nowhere else in other branches of the family, but does appear repeatedly among the descendents of Richard. Timothy is mentioned by Hutchins as a gentleman of the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in Oxford City, and as Steward of the University of Oxford. It seems likely that the young Timothy may have owed his preferment at Oxford to two of his uncles, Dr. George Ryves and Sir William Ryves. Dr. George was chancellor of Oxford in 1601, was warden of New College in 1599. Sir William was Chancellor at law in 1615; J.P. in 1618 of the parish of St. Mary Magdalene. From the scarcity of records it is supposed that Timothy was orphaned at an early age and that he, as only son and heir, was taken under the care of his kinsmen. It is a fact that Timothy named two of his sons for these two uncles who were in a position to befriend a needy relative. The parish register shows two marriages and two sons by each wife. Note: may have been born at Woodstock, England.